Bureaucracy: Message from the President of the United States: In Compliance with a Resolution of the Senate, Relating to the Condition of Texas

Jackson, Andrew. Message from the President of the United States: In Compliance with a Resolution of the Senate, Relating to the Condition of Texas. Washington, 1836.

About

This pamphlet collects letters, documents, and reports relating to the establishment of the Republic of Texas as an independent territory following the military conflict between Texas settlers and the government of Mexico in 1835-1836. These documents include Texas’s Declaration of Independence from Mexico and the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, both of which were issued in March of 1836. Delegates in Washington adopted the Declaration of Independence on March 2, 1836. At this time, the siege of the Alamo was nearing its conclusion in what is now San Antonio. The Constitution was adopted approximately two weeks later, on March 17. Additional materials collected in the pamphlet include correspondence between the seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson, various other members of the U.S. government, and the leaders of the newly established Republic of Texas.

These letters illuminate an important time for the United States and Mexico, but more specifically for Texas. In the 1820s, American settlers negotiated with the Mexican government to establish a colony in Texas. In the early 1830s, however, Mexican authorities attempted to revoke the settlers’ agreement because of disputes over slavery in the territory. These disputes ultimately evolved into military conflict in 1834. The following year, after a series of military successes, the Texian settlers declared their independence from Mexico and established the Republic of Texas, an independent territory. The documents collected here represent a brief period of approximately three months, from March to June 1836. During this time, the Republic of Texas sent several emissaries to the United States to gain official recognition for the new republic’s independence from Mexico. Official recognition had serious implications for trade agreements and diplomatic relations. But more importantly, as is clear in these documents, Texian representatives wanted to receive assurance that the U.S. would not side with Mexico to bring the Texas territory back under Mexican control. In one letter to Secretary of State John Forsyth, for instance, two representatives of Texas indicated their certainty that “the Government of the United States … will adopt such course of action in relation to the matter [of independence] as it may deem due to the Republic of Texas, and accordant with those principles both of strict neutrality and impartial justice which have ever characterized its intercourse with foreign nations.” Of course, the United States did not intercede on Mexico’s behalf, and the U.S. granted the Republic of Texas official recognition as an independent republic in 1837. Texas remained an independent republic until it was annexed by the United States in 1848 following the Mexican-American War.

Find Message from the President of the United States: In Compliance with a Resolution of the Senate, Relating to the Condition of Texas in the UNT Libraries Catalog.